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  • Wilhelm, Kate

    Margaret and I

    Someone is thinking about Margaret. "I wondered about Margaret, and what she would do next. I didn't care unless she went the route of drugs They make her try and get at me sometimes, and that can be bothersome. She is so terribly afraid of me." Who so casually draws Margaret to the brink of hysteria - then, just as casually, tries to walk away? Her subconsciousness does, when it becomes a living, breathing personality with an ego all its own - setting the stage for a remarkable transformation scarcely envisioned by the science of man.
  • Randall, Marta

    Islands

    “The perfect book for those who fancy the darker, grittier side of mystery. A hit-you-in-the-guts psychothriller, this is a compelling story of one man’s search for truth and inner peace.”—Mystery Scene

    “This is a story for those who can handle grit with their detective fiction . . . provocative and disturbing portrait of Cape Cod youth running seriously amok. It’s worth the turn of the screw on the reader’s thumbs, however, for Mr. Peffer’s unforgettable characters, startling revelations, and haunting New England atmospherics.”—Vineyard Gazette

    Returning to his hometown was something Billy Bagwell always dreaded. But he felt he owed it to Tina, the object of his childhood sexual obsession, to see her off properly. Even in death she could seduce him to her. Upon his return to Wood’s Hole on Cape Cod, Billy’s past with his old friends—especially his best friend, present-day Catholic priest Zal—floods his mind with classic machismo and rite-of-passage boyhood events. But some of their moments were a bit darker, and all seemed to revolve around or involve Tina . . . moments that Billy didn’t want to remember.

    This psycho-thriller carries Billy deeper and deeper into long-repressed memories of 35-year-old crimes. As the days grow darker, Billy finds himself caught in a turbulent tide of past homoerotic encounters, lost innocence, rage, religion, and lust.

    Randall Peffer is the author of Watermen, Logs of the Dead Pirates Society, and many travel guides. His writing has appeared in Smithsonian, Reader’s Digest, National Geographic, The New York Times, The Washington Post, San Francisco Examiner, Chicago Tribune, and many other publications. He teaches literature and writing at Phillips Academy Andover. This is his first novel.

  • Delany, Samuel R.

    Triton

    In a story as exciting as any science fiction adventure written, Samuel R. Delany's 1976 SF novel, originally published as Triton, takes us on a tour of a utopian society at war with . . . our own Earth! High wit in this future comedy of manners allows Delany to question gender roles and sexual expectations at a level that, 20 years after it was written, still make it a coruscating portrait of "the happily reasonable man," Bron Helstrom -- an immigrant to the embattled world of Triton, whose troubles become more and more complex, till there is nothing left for him to do but become a woman. Against a background of high adventure, this minuet of a novel dances from the farthest limits of the solar system to Earth's own Outer Mongolia. Alternately funny and moving, it is a wide-ranging tale in which character after character turns out not to be what he -- or she -- seems.
  • Cowper, Richard

    The Road to Corlay

    On the Eve of the Fourth Millennium a slowly-building civilization, struggling out of the rubble of the Drowning, was crushed beneath the sceptre of a powerful and repressive Church. But on the Eve of the Fourth Millennium the sound of a magical pipe was heard, and the air was filled with songs of freedom and enlightenment. And on the Eve of the Fourth Millennium the Boy appeared, bringing the gift of sacrilege, a harbinger of the future, heralding the arrival of the White Bird of Dawning. It is the coming of a New Age. A glorious future bearing the presents of the past!
  • Attanasio, A. A.

    Radix

    INTERIOR ILLUSTRATIONS BY JAMES O’BARR * COVER ART BY JOHN BERGIN * NEBULA AWARD NOMINEE *** New Corrected February, 2011A young man's odyssey of self discovery in a world eerily alien, yet hauntingly familiar. * Set thirteen centuries in the future, A. A. Attanasio meticulously creates a brilliantly realized Earth, rich in detail and filled with beings brought to life with intense energy. * In this strange and beautiful world, Sumner Kagan will change from an adolescent outcast to a warrior with god-like powers and in the process take us on an epic and transcendent journey. ***“An instant classic.”—Washington Post * “RADIX is sheer pleasure to read: brimming with living characters, splendid adventures....It is an exhilarating novel.”—Minneapolis Tribune * “Attanasio invents language, customs, hardware, history, small animals, and more good supporting characters than most writers can get into five books.”—Newsday * “Here stands a high talent; a truly amazing, original, towering talent.”—L.A. Times * “Alive with enough zest and daring to rise above the sf/fantasy run-of-the-mill”—Kirkus Reviews
  • Hoban, Russell

    Riddley Walker

    "A hero with Huck Finn's heart and charm, lighting by El Greco and jokes by Punch and Judy.... Riddley Walker is haunting and fiercely imagined and -- this matters most -- intensely ponderable." -- Benjamin DeMott, The New York Times Book Review

    "This is what literature is meant to be." -- Anthony Burgess

    "Russell Hoban has brought off an extraordinary feat of imagination and style.... The conviction and consistency are total. Funny, terrible, haunting and unsettling, this book is a masterpiece." -- Anthony Thwaite, Observer

    "Extraordinary... Suffused with melancholy and wonder, beautifully written, Riddley Walker is a novel that people will be reading for a long, long time." -- Michael Dirda, Washington Post Book World

    "Stunning, delicious, designed to prevent the modern reader from becoming stupid." -- John Leonard, The New York Times

    "Highly enjoyable... An intriguing plot... Ferociously inventive." -- Walter Clemons, Newsweek

    "Astounding... Hoban's soaring flight of imagination is that golden rarity, a dazzlingly realized work of genius." -- Jane Clapperton, Cosmopolitan

    "An imaginative intensity that is rare in contemporary fiction.' -- Paul Gray, Time

    Riddley Walker is a brilliant, unique, completely realized work of fiction. One reads it again and again, discovering new wonders every time through. Set in a remote future in a post-nuclear holocaust England (Inland), Hoban has imagined a humanity regressed to an iron-age, semi-literate state -- and invented a language to represent it. Riddley is at once the Huck Finn and the Stephen Dedalus of his culture -- rebel, change agent, and artist. Read again or for the first time this masterpiece of 20th-century literature with new material by the author.

  • Anderson, Poul

    There Will Be Time

    Jack Havig, a man born with the ability to move at will through the past and the future of mankind, must save the world from a doomed future of tyranny before his time runs out. Reprint.
  • Charnas, Suzy McKee

    The Vampire Tapestry

    Hailed by Stephen King as "scary and suspenseful" and "unputdownable," and by Peter Beagle, author of The Last Unicorn, as "The best vampire novel I have ever read," The Vampire Tapestry examines the classic monster as a biological, rather than supernatural, predator who awakens from hibernation every few decades needing to relearn human culture. After years of secret effort, the self-styled Edward Weyland has become a respected anthropology professor and director of a sleep research lab. With reliable access to unsuspecting blood donors, he grows complacent and makes a near-fatal error. First critically wounded by a strong and canny woman, then imprisoned and humiliated by a power-mad Satanist, he is forced on a journey toward an empathy with his prey that threatens the foundations of his survival.The Vampire Tapestry features cover art by Cory and Catska Ench.
  • Aldiss, Brian

    Helliconia Spring

    This is the first volume of the Helliconia Trilogy-a monumental saga that goes beyond anything yet created by this master among today's imaginative writers. Helliconia, the chief planet of a binary system, is emerging from its centuries long winter. The tribes of the equatorial continent emerge from their hiding places and are again able to dispute possession of the planet with the ferocious phagors. In Oldorando, love, trade and coinage are being rediscovered. - Aldiss's short story "Supertoys Last All Summer Long" was the basis for the Steven Spielberg/Stanley Kubrick film A.I.-Artificial Intelligence. - Introduction by the author. - Over 1,000,000 Brian W. Aldiss books in print! - Aldiss novel Frankenstein Unbound was adapted for the film starring John Hurt and Bridget Fonda. - Aldiss's was named a science fiction Grandmaster in 2000 by the Science Fiction Writers of America - A Robert Silverberg selection
  • Dick, Philip K.

    The Transmigration of Timothy Archer

    The final book in Philip K. Dicks VALIS trilogy, The Transmigration of Timothy Archer brings the authors search for the identity and nature of God to a close. The novel follows Bishop Timothy Archer as he travels to Israel, ostensibly to examine ancient scrolls bearing the words of Christ. But, more importantly, this leads him to examine the decisions he made during his life and how they may have contributed to the suicide of his mistress and son.

    This quiet, introspective book is one of Dick's most philosophical and literary, delving into the mysteries of religion and the mysteries of faith itself. As one of Dick's final works, it also provides unique insight into the mind of a genius, whose work was still in the process of maturing at the time of his death.

  • Benford, Gregory

    Against Infinity

    A gripping, masterfully written adventure set against the violent beauty of a planet in the throes of cataclymic transformation, Against Infinity is Gregory Benford's timeless portrait of a young man's comming of age.

    On the poisonous, icy surface of Ganymede, a man and a boy are on a deadly hunt.Their prey is the Aleph--an unknowable alien artifact that roamed and ruled Ganymede for countless millennia. Indescribable, infinitely dangerous, the Aleph haunts men's dreams and destroys all efforts to terraform Ganymede into a habitable planet. Now in a modern world ancient struggle is joined, as a boy seeks manhood, a man seeks enlightenment, and a society seeks the power to rule the universe.

    On the poisonous, icy surface of Ganymede, a man and a boy are on a hunt for the Aleph--an alien artifact that ruled Ganymede for countless millenia, Infinitely dangerous, the Aleph haunts men's dreams and destroys all efforts to terraform Ganymede into an habitable planet. Now an ancient struggle is joined, as a boy seeks manhood, a man seeks enlightenment, and a society seeks the power to rule the universe.
  • Vance, Jack

    Lyonesse

    A monument of fantastic literature to stand beside such classics as Dune and The Lord of the Rings, Lyonesse evokes the Elder Isles, a land of pre-Arthurian myth now lost beneath the Atlantic, where powerful sorcerers, aloof faeries, stalwart champions, and nobles eccentric, magnanimous, and cruel pursue intrigue among their separate worlds. In this first book of the trilogy, Suldrun's Garden, Prince Aillas of Troicinet is betrayed on his first diplomatic voyage and cast into the sea. Before he redeems his birthright, he must pass the breadth of Hybras Isle as prisoner, vagabond, and slave, an acquaintance of faeries, wizards, and errant knights, and lover to a sad and beautiful girl whose fate sets his undying hatred for her tyrannical father--Casmir, King of Lyonesse.
  • Spinrad, Norman

    The Void Captain's Tale

    Welcome aboard the sex-drive void ship Captain Genro commands the giant spaceship Dragon Zephyr - on board are ten thousand passengers in electrocoma, a smaller number of conscious passengers eagerly utilising the ship's dream chambers - and a Pilot. In the context of space travel, the Pilot is merely a biological component in the machine. Always a woman, her function is to launch the ship into the Jump y means of a cosmic orgasm. She is a pariah, shunned by all. Void Captain Genro should never even have spoken to his Pilot, let alone tried to embark on a relationship with her. When he did so, the result was every space traveller's nightmare. A Blind Jump into the Void
  • Shiner, Lewis

    Frontera

    Ten years ago the world's governments collapsed, and now the corporations are in control. Houston's Pulsystems has sent an expedition to the lost Martian colony of Frontera to search for survivors. Reese, aging hero of the US space program, knows better. The colonists are not only alive, they have discovered a secret so devastating that the new rulers of Earth will stop at nothing to own it. Reese is equally desperate to use it for his own very personal agenda. But none of them have reckoned with Kane, tortured veteran of the corporate wars, whose hallucinatory voices are urging him to complete an ancient cycle of heroism and alter the destiny of the human race.
  • Dann, Jack

    The Man Who Melted

    Introduction by Robert SilverbergThe Man Who Melted is a warning for the future. It is the Brave New World and 1984 for our time, for it gives us a glimpse into our own future—a future ruled by corporations that control deadly and powerful forms of mass manipulation. It is a prediction of what could happen...tomorrow. The Man Who Melted examines how technology affects us and changes our morality, and it questions how we might remain human in an inhuman world. Will the future disenfranchise or empower the individual? Here you’ll find new forms of sexuality, new perversions, new epiphanies, and an entirely new form of consciousness. Would you pay to "go down" with the Titanic? In this dystopia the Titanic is brought back from the bottom of the sea and refurbished, only to be sunk again for those who want the ultimate decadent experience. Some passengers pay to commit suicide by "going under" with the ship. The Man Who Melted has been called "one of the greatest science fiction novels of all time" by Science Fiction Age and is considered a genre classic. It is the stunning odyssey of a man searching through the glittering, apocalyptic landscape of the next century for a woman lost to him in a worldwide outbreak of telepathic fear. Here is a terrifying future where people can gamble away their hearts (and other organs) and telepathically taste the last flickering thoughts
  • Robinson, Kim Stanley

    The Wild Shore

    2047: For the small Pacific Coast community of San Onofre, life in the aftermath of a devastating nuclear attack is a matter of survival, a day-to-day struggle to stay alive. But young Hank Fletcher dreams of the world that might have been, and might yet be--and dreams of playing a crucial role in America's rebirth.
  • Wolfe, Gene

    Free Live Free

    "Free Live Free," said the newspaper ad, and the out-of-work detective Jim Stubb, the occultist Madame Serpentina, the salesman Ozzie Barnes, and the overweight prostitute Candy Garth are brought together to live for a time in Free's old house, a house scheduled for demolition to make way for a highway.Free drops mysterious hints of his exile from his homeland, and of the lost key to his return. And so when demolition occurs and Free disappears, the four make a pact to continue the search, which ultimately takes them far beyond their wildest dreams.This is character-driven science fiction at its best by a writer whom, at the time of its first publication, the Chicago Sun-Times called "science fiction's best genuine novelist."
  • Atwood, Margaret

    The Handmaid's Tale

    The Handmaid's Tale is not only a radical and brilliant departure for Margaret Atwood, it is a novel of such power that the reader will be unable to forget its images and its forecast. Set in the near future, it describes life in what was once the United States, now called the Republic of Gilead, a monotheocracy that has reacted to social unrest and a sharply declining birthrate by reverting to, and going beyond, the repressive intolerance of the original Puritans. The regime takes the Book of Genesis absolutely at its word, with bizarre consequences for the women and men of its population. The story is told through the eyes of Offred, one of the unfortunate Handmaids under the new social order. In condensed but eloquent prose, by turns cool-eyed, tender, despairing, passionate, and wry, she reveals to us the dark corners behind the establishment's calm facade, as certain tendencies now in existence are carried to their logical conclusions. The Handmaid's Tale is funny, unexpected, horrifying, and altogether convincing. It is at once scathing satire, dire warning, and tour de force. It is Margaret Atwood at her best.